Golf Bucks County

By Bob Oliver

Middletown Country Club

Middletown is a compact 80 acres of challenging golf, with rolling hills and large specimen trees that have watched many golfers travel its fairways over time. It has retained its old time feel with tees and greens in close proximity, allowing golfers to walk the course if they choose.

The Traveling Golfer

With host Tony Leodora will travel both near and far to bring viewers a look at some of the most spectacular golf destinations in the world!

20 May
2019

McCullough's a shore must play

Written by Bob Oliver

 

Bucks County has a wealth of fine golf challenges, but every once in a while we take to the road to sample other venues. 

Last month was one of those months. A time when circumstances meant being on the road, and that means playing other golf courses.

It had been years since sampling McCullough's Emerald Links in Egg Harbor, N.J.  Maybe as long as 10 years. It won't be that long to visit again. 

The Stephen Kay design has matured into a fine municipal course, one that has the feel of, well, the Emerald Isle. While not a replica course, many of the holes are pattered after great courses of Ireland, England and Scotland. 

Built on a landfill, McCullough's is a fun, challenging layout. Tees range from nearly 6,600 yards from the tips down to 5,244 from the sporty senior tees. The women's tees are at 4,462. Yet the undulating greens, fescue lined fairways, and strategis Kay style bunkering present a challenge from all tee boxes and for all levels of player.

A favorite is the 17th hole, pattered after number 11 at the Waterville Golf Links in Ireland, brought back memories of a trip over the pond. A short par five, it requires thought and positioning to ensure one evades mounds and bunkers. 

One of the challenges of the course - which other than two holes is basically treeless, is the dastardly winds which blanket the layout. Those winds can, on a "calm" day, still require a one club change in expected distance. Beware!

McCullough's Emerald Links is a true fun, challenging test, and worth the drive.

It's a must play course when you are down the shore...

 

16 Apr
2019

Flagstick in...or out?

Written by Bob Oliver

 

Nearly three months into the new year and new set of rules the questions continue on whether to leave the flagstick in the hole while putting or remove it as traditionally held. 

The new rules say one can leave it in, as their is no penalty for hitting the pin while putting as with the prior rules. However, some golfers are saying leaving the pin in the hole will cause putts to deflect or rebound out. 

For me, starting with several days in Florida in January, I've not removed the pin prior to any putt in 2018. In my experience, having the flagstick in the hole allows me to better view the putt. Now in the old days I'd have my caddie or a competitor "tend" the flagstick. But now I merely ask to leave it in. 

Not once have I regretted it. And, it speeds play. Nothing wrong with that. 

Of course, there are those who believe leaving it in will deflect balls. Only once this year, in 27 rounds, have I seen such a deflection. I have seen several times when a ball thought to have enough stream to speed past the hole - maybe even off the green - was slowed by the flagstick. Several have fallen into the cup.

Point it, there is no scientifically proven do or don't here. And I often side with speeding up play. So leave it in it is. 

 

 

10 Apr
2019

Players settling in to new rules

Written by Bob Oliver
 
 
 
It has been said that rules are made to be broken. But in golf, for real golfers, rules are the standard of play wanted and desired so that all competitors can battle evenly. 
Oh, sure, 80% of golfers do not have a "real" USGA handicap. 
One hears on the first tee, "I'm a 15". And then you watch that player shoot 80....or 100.
Still, even casual golfers tend to frown upon mulligans on every hole, gimmie putts of 20 feet for par, or moving a ball from outside the stakes inside the playing course.
The USGA completed a massive re-write of the rules with goals such as speeding up play, making rules more understandable, and overall simplifying a difficult game. While this reporter consistently points out strangeness of the USGA brain trust, the rule changes implemented for 2019 do make some sense. 
Right off the bat, one may leave the flagstick in the hole while on the putting green. There is no penalty for hitting the stick.  
For me, this makes sense. Heck, my eyes are bad. It's a whole lot simpler to leave flagstick in the cup while putting than having this guy stomp here, that guy wanting you on other side of hole, pulling and leaving on green for one player, tending pin for another.  While this can still occur, many of the regular players I compete with leave the pin in at all times. 
On a January day in Florida, nobody removed the flagstick from the hole the entire round. Not once.  And there was nary a problem. 
Another change was dropping ball from knee height.  Other than some asking what is knee height, it seems simple enough.
Also, on those pesky lost balls, you have three minutes to look for it rather than five. A time-saver. 
One can ground their club in a penalty area, repair spike marks, remove loose impediments in bunkers and play ready golf. 
A few seconds here and there and minutes are cut from the length of time it takes to play a round. 
One major play change that affects most golfers is the alternative to the former stroke and distance penalty for a lost ball or out of bounds shot to add two strokes to their score and drop a ball in the fairway rather than trudge back to the tee and take another stab at things. Now, this is not the case if one has played a provisional ball. In such a case you check for the circumstances of the first ball (OB?, Lost) and if it is either playing the provisional ball is the option. 
Overall, the new rules appear to be speeding up play, which for most means a more enjoyable game. It's nice the USGA is taking a step forward in this area. 
 

 

30 Mar
2019

Benvenuto fighting the fight

Written by Bob Oliver

 

Brittany Benvenuto is fighting the fight on ladies professional golf, playing on the Symetra Tour after a short season on the LPGA Tour.

 

The Symetra Tour - the top developmental circuit for the LPGA - offers outstanding competition and a place to hone one's game. Last year, playing on a medical exemption, made a couple cuts while getting into a few LPGA events. This season she's working hard on her game on the Symetra Tour, which visits Montgomery County May 31-June 2 at the Raven's Claw Golf Club in Pottstown.

 

Benvenuto, a native of Langhorne where she attended Neshaminy High School, has been consistent this year in three Symetra Tour events, making the cut in each. 

 

She was 31st in the Skyigolf Championship (77-69-67--286), 37th at the IOA Championship (71-76-77--224) and 48th at the Florida Natural Charity Classic (71-72-73--216).  She stands 40th on the money list.

 

A year ago at Seaview playing in the Shop-Rite LPGA Championship, Benvenuto spoke about the highs and lows of her career. "I've built my game so that I'm giving myself a shot, but there is a whole lot of work to be done," said Benvenuto, who was 38th in the season ending Symetra Tour Championship. "The injuries have set me back, but I'm optimistic."

 

She played in nine LPGA events and loved the taste of play at the highest level of women's golf. And she's hoping her game continues to improve in 2019 to get back to the LPGA next season.